May 12, 2014

IMPOSSIBLE | OLIVER BLOHM'S MICROWAVED PICTURES


OLIVER BLOHM'S MICROWAVED PICTURES

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He is currently working on different projects, as a photographers assistant as well as giving workshops in experimental instant photography, especially in the Impossible Partner Store Berlin, Sofortbildshop, where he also had the chance to exhibit his pictures a few months ago.
One of his experimentations involves the use of a… microwave. You might think that Instant Photography and microwaves have nothing in common, and we must admit that these kind of experimentations are not the safest – but they do provide amazing and unique results!

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May 9, 2014

PETAPIXEL | PHOTOGRAPHER OLIVER BLOHM PROCESSES HIS POLAROIDS IN A MICROWAVE


PHOTOGRAPHER OLIVER BLOHM PROCESSES HIS POLAROIDS IN A MICROWAVE

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What do Polaroids and Hot Pockets have in common? 99.9% of the time nothing. But, thanks to Berlin-based fashion and portrait photographer, Oliver Blohm, there’s that .1% remaining. To create that .1%, he has literally developed a way in which to combine Polaroid film with a microwave to create some very… unique photographs.

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May 8, 2014

THE PHOBLOGRAPHER | THIS IS WHAT HAPPENED WHEN YOU NUKE POLAROIDS IN THE MICROWAVE


THIS IS WHAT HAPPEND WHEN YOU NUKE POLAROIDS IN THE MICROWAVE

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Photographer Oliver Blohm had a problem. He absolutely loves instant film. But as many photographers know not only is it tough to come by but it also has its problems. The older Polaroid film used to develop fairly quickly–as does the current available stock of Fujifilm instant emulsions. But according to him, the closest thing is Impossible Project film. However, the development time can take 30-45 minutes.

That’s longer than some folks’ lunch breaks! And with that in mind, Oliver set about trying to find a way to speed up the process. By using a microwave and a shield that is based on a wet carton and glass, he discovered a procedure that ended up shortening the development time back to two or three minutes. As a result though, you also get a more or less controllable process of destroying the film material which creates unique failures, textures, shapes, burns, etc.He calls the series Hatzfraz/Fast Food.

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